Can I ask the pharmacy to substitute a generic drug for the drug prescribed by my doctor?

Each state has a law that allows pharmacists to substitute less expensive generic drugs for many brand names. However, if your doctor specifies that a brand name must be dispensed, then the pharmacist may not substitute the generic. Sometimes an acceptable generic is available that your doctor may not be aware of. In this case, your pharmacist may be able to consult with your doctor to suggest an effective medication that costs less.

 

Are generic drugs as safe as brand name drugs?

Yes. The FDA requires that all drugs be safe and effective and that their benefits outweigh their risks. Since generics use the same active ingredients and are shown to work the same way in the body, they have the same risks and benefits as their brand name counterparts.

What is a generic drug?

When a drug patent expires other companies may produce a generic version of the brand name drug. A generic medication, also approved by the FDA, is basically a copy of the brand name drug and is marketed under its chemical name. A generic drug may have a different color or shape than its brand name counterpart, but it must have the same active ingredients, strength, and dosage form (i.e., pill, liquid, or injection), and provide the same effectiveness and safety as its brand name counterpart.